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Clare publican (91) reluctantly retires after more than 80 years pulling pints

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ONE OF Ireland’s oldest barmen has reluctantly called time at his much-loved pub more than 80 years after he pulled his first pint.

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Video on The Cost of Care

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Copy and paste into your browser : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-14292572

As the first post-war babies begin to draw their pensions, the care system has to prepare for a large rise in the number of older people.

What changes have to be made if we are to cope with the cost of meeting the needs and demands of an elderly population in future?

In the first of a series of films examining the cost of care, Newsnight Scotland looked at the implications of a growing elderly population being supported by a shrinking number of workers.

Vintage viewing: cinema's take on getting old

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SECOND OPINION: The process of ageing can be seen in a different light, writes DES O'NEILL

SUMMER HOLIDAYS represent a wonderful opportunity to temporarily reverse the time impoverishment of modern life. Traditionally, we catch up with the pile of unread novels we picked up over the year. Now, with the ready availability of a wide range of inexpensive DVDs, we can also finally get those impulse buys out of their virginal cellophane wrappers and enjoy them in a relaxed and receptive mood.

If you would like to consider a new angle, and explore (and be entertained) by the major social phenomenon of our time – ageing – while relaxing after a day on the beach or visiting cultural highlights, you can access a treasure house of cinematic pleasure for less than €10 a throw, and often for considerably less.

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Study illuminates seven risk factors for Alzheimer's

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A recent study in the US suggests the various risk factors that can increase the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease.

There are currently more than 44,000 people in Ireland with dementia, with the number expected to be in excess of 104,000 by 2036. So, many of us alive and well today could find ourselves among those ranks in the future.

The researchers presented their calculations in 'The Lancet' medical journal. They looked at the worldwide and US populations.

For the worldwide population, 33.9 million people are estimated to have Alzheimer's disease.

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The Florida philosophy

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It attracts thousands of retirees with its beaches and golf courses, but can Florida really turn back the clock? Its residents seem to think so

‘AGE.” The platinum blonde in tight raspberry capri pants, waving impressive sculpted nails, fingers adorned with rings the size of golf balls, shrugs. “As far as I am concerned, 80 is the new 60 or maybe even 55, at a push.”

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No party can afford to ignore the “sandwich generation”

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The north-facing windows at the back of 10 Downing Street look over immaculate lawns on to Horse Guards Parade - a view of imperial pomp that matches the baroque chandeliers and ornate cornices inside. This makes the scene from the west windows all the more incongruous: a wooden climbing frame, a slide and scattered toys in the garden of No 11. The paraphernalia of childhood are a reminder that this seat of power is also a family home.

All three main party leaders have young children, which puts a peculiar complexion on power. When the Chinese premier, Wen Jiabao, arrived for a visit to the UK on 26 June, Nick Clegg had to leave a frenzied family water fight in his back garden for a dreary diplomatic dinner. Ed Miliband's leadership of the Labour Party got off to a faltering start last year partly because he disappeared on paternity leave shortly after winning the job.

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We Really are as Old as we Feel

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Our lifespans are limited, but changing thought patterns can slow the ageing process, writes WILLIAM REVILLE

THE FASTEST-growing segment of the world population now is the very old – it is projected that centenarians will number six million worldwide by the year 2050 and 25 per cent of Western populations will be 60 or over. Lifespans increased by about 30 years over the course of the 20th century and much research is under way to discover how to further lengthen lifespan. Some increases can be expected but there is probably a biological limit to attainable human lifespan. However, the good news is that psychological studies have shown your best bet for staying young lies in the old saying, “You’re only as old as you feel.”

Our bodies are made of fundamental biological units called cells. It is possible to take cells from bodily tissues and to grow them in a dish in the laboratory. Supplied with appropriate nutrients, such cells will grow and divide, each into two daughters, each of which will grow and divide again, and so on. It used be thought that, in the absence of some disease developing, such cells would continue to grow and divide forever.

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Join Age Action and support Positive Ageing

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23 September to 1 October 2011

Positive Ageing Week is a festival which highlights the positive aspects of ageing and celebrates the contribution older people have made and continue to make to their communities. Age Action are asking individuals and groups to organise an event or an activity to celebrate Positive Ageing Week.

Anybody can take part!

If you are interested in organising an activity or event please contact us on 01-475 6989 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for a Positive Ageing Week pack.

Alternatively you can apply online - http://www.ageaction.ie/positive-ageing-week

Louth's great agefriendly reputation

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COUNTY Louth's pioneering Age-Friendly Strategy has been so successful it has secured Louth a place in the World Health Organisation's Age Friendly Cities.

The strategy, which was launched in November 2009, will be reviewed at a special conference taking place in Dundalk this week.

Louth is Ireland's first Age Friendly County and since its designation, a number of other counties around the country have followed suit, establishing their own strategies inspired by and taking example from County Louth.

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Eye Test could be used to detect Alzheimer's

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SCIENTISTS in Australia are reporting encouraging early results from a simple eye test they hope will give a noninvasive way to detect signs of Alzheimer’s disease

Although it has been tried on just a small number of people and more research is needed, the experimental test has a solid basis: Alzheimer’s is known to cause changes in the eyes, not just the brain. Other scientists in the United States also are working on an eye test for detecting the disease.

A separate study found that falls might be an early warning sign of Alzheimer’s. People who seemed to have healthy minds but who were discovered to have hidden plaques clogging their brains were five times more likely to fall during the study than those without these brain deposits, which are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s.

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Healthy body vital to beat Alzheimer's say doctors

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Keeping the whole body as healthy as possible could be key to avoiding Alzheimer's, a study has found.

A wide range of problems not usually associated with mental decline, such as arthritis and stomach complaints, influence the risk of dementia in later life, research has shown.

Scientists in Canada studied 7,239 people aged 65 and older who were free of Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia.

Participants were asked about health problems not previously linked to dementia and assessed at five and 10 years.

The problems included arthritis, trouble hearing or seeing, denture fit, chest, skin or bladder complaints, sinus issues, broken bones and feet or ankle conditions.

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DocMorris plans sector shake-up

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The DocMorris pharmacy chain plans to extend its pharmacy brand to more than 60 locations in Ireland over the next two years.

With that will come accessible advice, added services such as cholesterol testing and lower prices for consumers, according to its managing director, Cormac Tobin.

If Tobin has his way, he will be advertising the price of medicines and delivering them to your door in much the same way as Tesco and Superquinn do.

The DocMorris chain, which is owned by the €22 billion Celesio group (which owns DocMorris and Unicare pharmacy), will refit its remaining 64 Unicare pharmacies.

It also plans to franchise the brand and open a number of new DocMorris outlets.

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More awareness of falls needed

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One in three people over the age of 65 suffers from a fall every year in Ireland, with most of these falling again within months, the TRIL (Technology Research for independent Living) Centre has said.

According to the centre, two-thirds of older people who suffer from a fall go on to suffer from another fall within six months. This can lead to hospitalisation and a significant decline in overall health.

Furthermore, as well as physical injuries, a fall can have a big impact on a person's psychological health. People who fall may suffer depression, anxiety and isolation as a result.

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Hook, Growing Old Disgracefully

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RADIO REVIEW: IN A POPULAR culture obsessed with youth and newness, the concept of growing old disgracefully can seem the ultimate act of defiance. To be able to cock a snook at the conventions of age while upsetting the preconceptions of the young is a comforting prospect as the years race by. It is a difficult trick to pull off, but some manage to do so, even turning it into a spectacular second act.

Having been a businessman and rugby coach for most of his life, George Hook has had a late-blooming career as a high-profile broadcaster: on The Right Hook (Newstalk, weekdays) he regularly draws on his years of experience to expound a world view that is as unpredictable as it is irascible.

Monday’s show, for instance, looked at an idea beloved of

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The Carers Association One Voice Campaign

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FOLLOWING ‘Primetime Investigates’ revelations about the effects of State cuts on the lives of family carers, The Carers Association has unveiled its “One Voice” Campaign. The organisation is urging Offaly’s 2,691 family carers to join them in the fight for a better life for family carers.

Last week’s (Monday 30th May) ‘Primetime Investigates’ programme on ‘The Human Price of Cut Backs’ conducted extensive research into the effects of cuts on family carers and found that 68% have been affected by reductions in the Carers Allowance/benefit, 17% cent provide an additional 20 hours of care per week with cuts to Home Care services, 30% had to wait three months for their carers payments to be processed, 43% have had to give up work to provide care and overall, 82 % have been affected by cutbacks in State services

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Study finds elderly 'dread' going into home

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OLDER PEOPLE’S dread of going into nursing homes is so pronounced that many would prefer to be cared for by their family even when they are experiencing elder abuse, a study has claimed.

A Total Indifference to our Dignity – Older People’s Understanding of Elder Abuse also found a general tendency in society to dismiss people’s views and rights as they grow older, leaving them vulnerable to abuse.

The cross-Border study, which was funded by the Centre for Ageing Research and Development and produced by Age Action Ireland, identified older people’s “dread” at having to go into nursing homes. This fear was felt particularly strongly in the Republic when compared with Northern Ireland due to a shortfall in assisted living and sheltered housing options in the South.

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33% OF PEOPLE DON’T NEED TO BE IN NURSING HOME - GOVERNMENT COULD SAVE MILLIONS.

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With over €1 billion being spent on the Fair Deal in Ireland and 33% of people not needing to be in an nursing home, the Government are spending €330 million on people that could be looked after at home at a fraction of the cost.

At present 4.5% of the older population in Ireland live in long-stay residential care. That is 40% higher than the EU average of 3.2%. Of there residents 33% are assessed as either a low or medium dependency which means they could easily be cared for in the community. This means that with an average weekly cost of an nursing home at €778, there are substantial savings to be made if a big percentage of these people can be kept at home.

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CJD research could help Alzheimer's sufferers

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Drugs being developed to tackle CJD could also help block Alzheimer's, research shows

Scientists funded by the Medical Research Council UK (MRC) and Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) have identified two antibodies which could help block the onset of Alzheimer's disease in the brain.

The antibodies, ICSM-18 and ICSM-35, were already known to play a crucial role in preventing 'protein misfolding'; the main cause of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD), the human form of mad cow disease.

This discovery represents a significant step forward in the battle to develop drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease- a devastating neurodegenerative illness which affects more than 20 million people worldwide.

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Government to carry out review of health policy

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The State will look at how to improve health, reduce inequalities and reduce the cost to the health system, writes MARTIN WALL

THE GOVERNMENT is to carry out a review of public health policy with a view to developing a new policy framework in this area over the months ahead.

The review, which was authorised by the Cabinet last week, will “describe the approaches and priority objectives and actions needed to protect and improve health, reduce inequalities and reduce the cost burden of non-communicable diseases on the health system”.

The Minister for Health, James Reilly, will host a national consultation day in Dublin next Monday at which a number of international experts in the field of public health will speak.

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Heels over head when it comes to footwear

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Fashion-conscious women are risking life and limb by perching precariously atop skyscraper stilettoes

WE’RE ALL familiar with the term “fashion victim”. Formerly used to describe a shopper in thrall to the latest trend, this may perhaps now be applied more literally to the hoards of teetering women who are taking a tumble in the name of fashion.

Lately it would seem that stylish women are increasingly willing to risk life and limb by perching precariously atop a pair of skyscraper heels. The danger intensifies when dancing and alcohol are introduced into the mix and sadly it seems that even after you’ve kicked off the heels after a night out problems can still arise.

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Dementia & Diabetes Link

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A team of scientists from the University of Ulster are leading the way in the race to find a cure for dementia.

Alzheimer's Research UK has awarded the scientists a grant of £100,000 which will be used over the next two years to establish how an existing diabetes drug could help treat Alzheimer’s disease.

Doctor Christian Holscher says his team will focus on a drug called liraglutide (Victoza) which is currently used to help treat two different types of diabetes.

The latest round of funding follows research carried out last year that showed “promising implications” in the search to find a cure for the disease.

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Carers save the UK £119bn a year

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UK's 6 million carers make 'massive contribution' to society but are struggling as services and benefits are cut

Sherry Pugh and Terry Nichols and their sons. William has cerebral palsy and needs round the clock care. They work alternate shifts, so someone is always there for William. Photograph: Carers UK Carers who look after relatives or friends are saving the nation £119bn a year, or almost as much as the entire cost of the NHS, according to the latest calculation by researchers.

The figure, equivalent to £13.6m every hour, represents the value of the contribution of the estimated 6.4 million informal carers when priced at the official unit cost of home care by paid workers, £18 an hour.

As well as coming close to total NHS expenditure, the £119bn is three times the defence budget. It has risen almost 40% since 2007, when the value of carers was put at £87bn, a sign of the growing number of people who are taking on caring responsibilities.

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Queen is an example of how ageing is changing

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Community Services for Older People, Cabra and Drumcondra Event 28th of May

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Would you like to know about Community Services available for Older People in Cabra and Drumcondra ?

Join Comfort Keepers for an Information Afternoon in Cabra Library on the Navan Road, Thursday 26th of May 2011 from 2.30 to 5pm.

Meet the experts! Talks from

Unicare Pharmacist The Physio Co. Physiotherapist Public Health Nurse Comfort Keepers Home Care The Carers Association

Share advice, support and fellowship.

Location: Cabra Library, Navan Road. Date: Thursday 26th May 2011 Time: 2:30pm - 5pm

Contact Julie Roberts RGN Comfort Keepers Home Care This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 01 879 7777

Many with early Alzheimer's misdiagnosed

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A new study has found that a significant number of people who develop early-onset Alzheimer's disease may be misdiagnosed because they do not initially suffer problems with their memory.

Early-onset Alzheimer's refers to people who develop the disease before the age of 65.

There is no single test that can determine if a person has Alzheimer's. Instead, the diagnosis will usually be based on a careful medical evaluation that will include things such as the patients' full medical history, blood tests and a brain scan.

Memory loss is widely accepted as one of the most common early indicators of the disease.

Spanish researchers reviewed the cases of 40 people whose brains had been donated to the Neurological Tissue Bank at the University of Barcelona School of Medicine after their deaths. All of the brain samples confirmed that the people had Alzheimer's when alive.

The researchers also reviewed information about the age at which the symptoms began and family history.

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